If you plan to leave, or have already left, your employer we should discuss a rollover IRA so transfer of your retirement money from your employer's plan is accomplished without triggering income tax.

The type of retirement plan your business can establish depends upon the type of business entity, number of employees and other factors. I can help you determine the retirement vehicles available and which one should be adopted.

IRAs and qualified plans create a unique planning challenge in that these assets are subject to income tax when received by the beneficiary. One way to help reduce the tax impact is to structure these accounts to provide the longest term payout possible; deferring income tax as long as possible minimizes the overall tax impact and allows the account to grow tax free.  To achieve this maximum 'stretch-out', you should name individuals who are young (e.g., children or grandchildren) as the designated beneficiary of your tax-qualified plans and, significantly, the beneficiary should take only those minimum distributions that are required by law. The younger the beneficiary, the smaller these required minimum distributions.  By naming a trust as the beneficiary of your tax-qualified plans, you can ensure that the beneficiary defers the income and that these assets remain protected from creditors or a former son or daughter-in-law. I recommend that this trust be a stand-alone Retirement Trust (separate from your revocable living trust and other trusts) to ensure that it accomplishes your objectives while also ensuring the maximum tax deferral permitted under the law. This trust can either pay out the required minimum distribution to the beneficiary or it can accumulate these distributions and pay out trust assets pursuant to the standard you set in advance (e.g., for higher education, etc.)
Wealth Counsel Advisor Forum Estate Planning